Support Groups

Reach out to someone who has been there

Support groups help you feel less isolated as you make connections and share experiences. You can meet others who are going through similar challenges.

All support groups are free and open to adults experiencing the group’s specific mental health challenge.
For more information call the MHA at 765-742-1800.

Click here for a map to MHA.

Anxiety and Depression Support Group

1st and 3rd Wednesdays of each month
6:00pm – 7:30pm
Conference Room - MHA Community Building
914 South Street, Lafayette, IN

A self-help support group for anyone with anxiety and depression. 

Bipolar Disorder Support Group

1st and 3rd Wednesdays of each month
6:00pm – 7:30pm
Conference Room A - MHA Community Building
914 South Street, Lafayette, IN

A self-help support group for anyone with bipolar disorder.

Grupo de Apoyo: Estrés
Stress Support Group for Spanish Speaking Adults

Grupo de Apoyo: Estrés is on SUMMER BREAK. No meeting in July and August.

El 4to miércoles de cada mes a las 6:00 pm
Fourth Wednesday of each month
6:00pm – 7:30pm
Conference Room – MHA Community Building
914 South Street, Lafayette, IN

A Spanish speaking self-help support group for anyone with anxiety and stress.  

Parents of Children with ADD/ADHD

First Monday of each month

7:00pm – 8:30pm
Conference Room - MHA Community Building
914 South Street, Lafayette, IN

Parents of children who have ADD/ADHD.

Survivors of Sexual Assault Support Group

Second Wednesday of each month
6:00pm – 7:30pm
Conference Room - MHA Community Building
914 South Street, Lafayette, IN

A self-help support group for anyone who has been sexually assaulted.

Survivors of Suicide Support Group 

Third Monday of each month
7:00pm – 8:30pm
Conference Room - MHA Community Building
914 South Street, Lafayette, IN

A self-help support group for adults who have lost someone they care about through suicide.



What's New

  • Suicide is skyrocketing in young people, and their screens and smartphones have nothing to do with it

    Date:

    Author: Hilary Brueck

    • Suicide has risen dramatically among young Americans from ages 10 to 24. It is now the second leading cause of death after accidents. 
    • Child psychologist Peter Gray says the trend may be linked not to social media or screen time, but to more stressed out kids, who are driven to excel all the time.
    • Gray says unstructured play time is what helps children develop much-needed resilience and courage, and it's desperately missing in today's jam-packed student schedules
  • 20 Minute Contact with Nature Reduces Stress Hormone Cortisol

    Date:

    Author: Matt Prior: Frontier

    Taking at least twenty minutes out of your day to stroll or sit in a place that makes you feel in contact with nature will significantly lower your stress hormone levels. That’s the finding of a study that has established for the first time the most effective dose of an urban nature experience. Healthcare practitioners can use this discovery, published in Frontiers in Psychology, to prescribe ‘nature-pills’ in the knowledge that they have a real measurable effect.

  • Self-reported suicide attempts rising in black teens as other groups decline

    Date:

    Author: Robert Polner – NYU

    Self-reported suicide attempts rose significantly in African American teens, while they fell in teens of other ethnic backgrounds throughout an almost 20-year study. Researchers report suicide attempts increased at an accelerating rate in African American female teenagers, even as overall female suicide attempts declined.

  • Kids Under Pressure Innovative Therapy Using Music

    Date:

    Author: Today with Hoda and Jenna

    Dr. Brette Genzel-Derman, with support from rocker Dave Grohl, developed a program to help kids cope with depression and anxiety through music. The fourth hour of TODAY spotlights one particular patient’s story, then welcomes the doctor to chat about more.

  • Strong Student-Adult Relationships Can Lower Suicide Attempts in High School

    Date:

    Author: Traci Pedersen

    “One of the most important predictors of lower suicide attempt rates in this study was positive youth-adult connections widely spread across the school,” said Wyman, “we have to be thinking about the broader population to make sure more students are connected to adults prepared to support them.”