Applied Suicide Intervention Skills Training

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Applied Suicide Intervention Skills Training (ASIST) is a two-day interactive workshop in suicide first aid. ASIST teaches participants to recognize when someone may have thoughts of suicide and work with them to create a plan that will support their immediate safety. 

Learning goals and objectives

Over the course of their two-day workshop, ASIST participants learn to:

  • Understand the ways that personal and societal attitudes affect views on suicide and interventions
  • Provide guidance and suicide first aid to a person at risk in ways that meet their individual safety needs
  • Identify the key elements of an effective suicide safety plan and the actions required to implement it
  • Appreciate the value of improving and integrating suicide prevention resources in the community at large
  • Recognize other important aspects of suicide prevention including life-promotion and self-care


As the world’s leading suicide intervention workshop, the ASIST program is supported by numerous evaluations including independent and peer-reviewed studies. 


Upcoming ASIST Training in 2020:

Session 1 | Thursday, January 30 | 8:30 am - 5:00 pm - Applied Suicide Intervention Skills Training (ASIST) Part 1

Session 2 | Friday, January 31 | 8:30 am - 5:00 pm - Applied Suicide Intervention Skills Training (ASIST) Part 2


Course Value: $300
Your Cost: $150 - includes print materials, lunches, and CEUs.

For information, to register for a training, or to schedule this training for your organization please call 765.742.1800 or email Tenecia at tpyle@mhatipp.org.


What's New

  • Suicide is skyrocketing in young people, and their screens and smartphones have nothing to do with it

    Date:

    Author: Hilary Brueck

    • Suicide has risen dramatically among young Americans from ages 10 to 24. It is now the second leading cause of death after accidents. 
    • Child psychologist Peter Gray says the trend may be linked not to social media or screen time, but to more stressed out kids, who are driven to excel all the time.
    • Gray says unstructured play time is what helps children develop much-needed resilience and courage, and it's desperately missing in today's jam-packed student schedules
  • 20 Minute Contact with Nature Reduces Stress Hormone Cortisol

    Date:

    Author: Matt Prior: Frontier

    Taking at least twenty minutes out of your day to stroll or sit in a place that makes you feel in contact with nature will significantly lower your stress hormone levels. That’s the finding of a study that has established for the first time the most effective dose of an urban nature experience. Healthcare practitioners can use this discovery, published in Frontiers in Psychology, to prescribe ‘nature-pills’ in the knowledge that they have a real measurable effect.

  • Self-reported suicide attempts rising in black teens as other groups decline

    Date:

    Author: Robert Polner – NYU

    Self-reported suicide attempts rose significantly in African American teens, while they fell in teens of other ethnic backgrounds throughout an almost 20-year study. Researchers report suicide attempts increased at an accelerating rate in African American female teenagers, even as overall female suicide attempts declined.

  • Kids Under Pressure Innovative Therapy Using Music

    Date:

    Author: Today with Hoda and Jenna

    Dr. Brette Genzel-Derman, with support from rocker Dave Grohl, developed a program to help kids cope with depression and anxiety through music. The fourth hour of TODAY spotlights one particular patient’s story, then welcomes the doctor to chat about more.

  • Strong Student-Adult Relationships Can Lower Suicide Attempts in High School

    Date:

    Author: Traci Pedersen

    “One of the most important predictors of lower suicide attempt rates in this study was positive youth-adult connections widely spread across the school,” said Wyman, “we have to be thinking about the broader population to make sure more students are connected to adults prepared to support them.”